southeast iceland: last night in höfn

Sunday, August 21:  After leaving the Fláajökull glacier tongue, we continue to backtrack east along the Ring Road, where we run into a herd of Icelandic horses, and right across the street, some sheep.  Of course we have to stop for a visit.

Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn

I love how the horses’ long manes and bangs that cover their eyes.  They’re so adorable!

Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn

Just across the road, we find some sheep having a pow-wow.

Icelandic sheep
Icelandic sheep

Back in Höfn, we check into our new guesthouse Höfn Guesthouse.  It’s right above the town’s post office.  With 12 guest rooms, it has shared bathrooms and a little kitchenette with a microwave and electric kettle. No breakfast is served here. We settle in, have some hot tea and cheese and crackers.

Höfn Guesthouse
Höfn Guesthouse
Höfn Guesthouse
Höfn Guesthouse
Our room at Höfn Guesthouse
Our room at Höfn Guesthouse

After a bit of a rest, we head to Pakkhús, a restaurant overlooking the harbor in Höfn í Hornafjörður.  We have beers in the lower level while waiting for a table upstairs.  While sitting downstairs a little Dutch-looking girl with a bowl haircut seems to be fascinated with me.  She keeps walking over to our table and staring intently at me, as if I were some alien creature.

Pakkhús was originally built in 1932 as a warehouse, mainly from scrap wood of other houses.  The restaurant specializes in langoustine (Icelandic lobster); Höfn is often called the capital of langoustine in Iceland.  According to the menu, the langoustine here “comes fresh, straight from Sigurdur Olafsson SF44, the red ship often seen just outside our window and boats of Skinney Þinganes.”

I have Humar: oven grilled langoustine tails with spiced butter and garlic, served with mixed salad, bread and pink langoustine sauce.  It’s delicious!

Mike has Grænmeti: potatoes from local farm Seljavellir in a pie crust along with other vegetables, gratinated with icelandic feta cheese, served with mixed salad and yogurt sauce.

Mike at Pakkhús
Mike at Pakkhús

After dinner, we take a nice walk around the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður.  There’s a long trail through the marshes here.  Across the lagoon, we can see the glacier offshoots we visited today, one brilliantly lit by rays of sunlight.

The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
marshy path on the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður
marshy path on the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path

From the marsh trail, we can see the memorial to fishermen lost at sea; we visited this monument briefly last night.

memorial for fishermen lost at sea
memorial for fishermen lost at sea
Hornafjörður
Hornafjörður
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path

It’s cold and windy out on this promontory, and we’re feeling pretty bad now with our colds and coughs and tickling throats.  Though we’d like to stay out longer, we need our rest.

Tomorrow, we continue west to Vik.

Total steps today: 15,946 (6.76 miles).

4 thoughts on “southeast iceland: last night in höfn

    1. It was a pretty place to stay, Carol, but not as pretty as most of the other places we stayed. I have no idea why that little girl was so fascinated with me. Maybe my white hair? Although there are lots of light haired people in Iceland, so I’m not really sure! It was quite cute.🙂

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