south iceland: finishing our hike at vatnajökull national park and heading to vik

Monday, August 22:  The final section of our 5.5km loop hike at Vatnajökull National Park takes us around the traditional turf-roofed farmhouse of Sel.

Sel
Sel

The farm Sel in Skaftafell was built in 1912 and is a good example of the farms in this area until the middle of 1900.  Until 1974, the area was very isolated because of the glacier rivers on both sides.  Therefore the inhabitants had to provide themselves with whatever was needed.

These houses, for example, are built from driftwood collected from the coast.  The last residents in Sel were Ólöf Sigurðardóttir and her husband Runolfur Bjarnason, in 1946.  The farm is now under protection of the National Museum of Iceland.

The traditional turf-roofed farmhouse Sel
The traditional turf-roofed farmhouse Sel

From the vantage point at Sel, we can see the huge Skeiðarársandur stretching endlessly to the ocean.

Sel
Sel
Sel with the sandur backdrop
Sel with the sandur backdrop

I love this photo of an Icelandic horse standing on a slope with the sandur sprawled out behind and beneath him.

an Icelandic horse with the sandur behind
an Icelandic horse with the sandur behind
Skeiðarársandur
Skeiðarársandur
Sel
Sel
Sel
Sel

We go into the farmhouse where we find beds and a stove.  They’re no longer used today, but we can see how these hardy souls once lived.

We continue to follow the loop at Vatnajökull National Park, heading downhill all the way.

Sel
Sel
Sel
Sel
Sel
Sel
me in the backyard at Sel
me in the backyard at Sel
Mike at Sel
Mike at Sel

We cross a bridge over the river we had seen at the beginning of the hike and then get on the well-traveled trail.

finishing out hike at Vatnajökull National Park
finishing out hike at Vatnajökull National Park

Though it was tough climbing uphill at the beginning of the hike, I’m more wary heading downhill.  It’s very steep and gravelly, and since I’ve taken many a tumble on steep slopes covered in gravel, I proceed with caution.  Some areas luckily have rubber erosion matting, which helps me to keep my grip on the ground.

final views at Vatnajökull National Park
final views at Vatnajökull National Park

Below is a map of the national park.

the lay of the land
the lay of the land

I’m so happy to reach our car in the parking lot so I can finally sit down.  I’m exhausted.  Now we have a long drive ahead to Vik, where we’ll spend the night.

The Ring Road in this part of the country passes through some bizarre landscapes.  There is a vast desert-like plain of black volcanic sand with tufts of grasses, the Mýrdalssandur, where material from the Mýrdalsjökull glacier has been deposited.  Water from that glacier flows out to sea through this plain.

We also pass through an otherworldly landscape of rocks covered in a mossy brownish-green fuzz.  We get out to take a picture, and the wind is so strong it nearly lifts us up and carries us out to sea!

landscape east of Vik
landscape east of Vik
landscape east of Vik
landscape east of Vik

We pass through more endless sandy stretches with black rocks strewn haphazardly about.  Finally, after what seems like a drive to the furthest isolated reaches of the world, we arrive at the very nondescript Hotel Puffin, right in the center of Vik.  The wind is howling in this place!

Hotel Puffin is quite expensive and when we booked, the only room available was one with a terrace.  Though we had thoughts of sitting on a terrace having a glass of wine an overlooking a nice scene, we were on the first floor and overlooked a trashy looking building and a garbage bin.  No matter how we tried, we couldn’t get the terrace door open, so we finally gave up, knowing that it was too blustery and cold to use it anyway.

The rooms have an interesting volcanic pebble floor, which we haven’t seen in hotels elsewhere in Iceland.

our room at Hotel Puffin
our room at Hotel Puffin

After a bit of a rest, we head to dinner at Ströndin Bistro & Bar, which sits on the main road behind the N1 petrol station.  The place is packed.  Our waiter is Antonio, who hails from Germany but lived in New Zealand for 10 years;  he now lives here in Vik.  He is very helpful, trying to juggle a table of 10 and us; he seats us at the only empty table – for four – and asks if we would mind sharing a table with another couple; soon he brings a Swiss couple, Julie, a secretary for a law office, and Sebastian, a chemist.  They speak French, as well as perfect English.  They tell us that though some Swiss speak German, and they have studied German for 11 years, they still can’t speak it with other Swiss people. Because of the mountains separating communities, it’s easy to drive 100km and not be able to speak or understand the German spoken in the next town.

Sebastian and Julie at Ströndin Bistro
Sebastian and Julie at Ströndin Bistro

We so enjoy talking with these two.  We ask them their thoughts about Brexit and they think it is the beginning of the EU’s dissolution.  If Germany leaves, they say, it will fall apart.  Poor countries like France, Spain, Greece, and Portugal are pulling the rich northern countries down. The Swiss voted down a referendum for more vacation time and the French didn’t understand it, they tell us.  I love hearing the perspectives of people living in Europe just months before our looming election in November.

Our time here is the highlight of our day, a bit of warmth and social time to top off a long, cold and blustery day.  I enjoy a wonderful dinner of Plokkfiskur með rúgbrauði, Icelandic Cod stew with potatoes and onions, served with rye bread and butter.  Mike has Pönnusteikt Fagradalsbleikja með salati, bakaðri kartöflu og dillsinneps sósu, pan-fried Arctic char, served with baked potato, fresh salad and dill-mustard sauce.

Total steps today: 19,388 (8.22 miles).  Only two full days left in Iceland, sadly.

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southeast iceland: a hike to svartifoss & sjónarsker at vatnajökull national park

Monday, August 22:  After leaving the Interstellar scenes at Svínafellsjökull, we head further inland to the south end of Vatnajökull National Park, known as Skaftafell.  We had been in the north end of this huge park when we visited the waterfalls Dettifoss and Selfoss.  This is Europe’s largest protected reserve and was formed when the northern Jökulsárgljúfur National Park merged with Skaftafell National Park to the south in order “to protect the Vatnajökull ice cap and all its glacial run-off under one super-sized preserve,” according to Lonely Planet Iceland.

This area is Iceland’s most heavily touristed wilderness and apparently there are myriads of trails, both long and short, easy and difficult, here.  We’re aiming for a moderate hike, the 5.5km round trip hike from the visitor center to Svartifoss to Sjónarsker and finally to Sel, which I’ll cover in a different post.

As you can imagine, since we start at the bottom edge of the mountains, near the sprawling outwash plain of Skeiðarársandur, the hike is all uphill.

As we climb increasingly higher, we can see the sweeping Skeiðarársandur, the largest sandur in the world, which covers an area of 1,300 km2 (500 sq mi). It was formed by the “Skeiðarárjökull Glacier, a large outlet glacier draining south from Iceland’s largest ice cap Vatnajökull. This glacier is well-known for the massive glacier outburst floods, jökulhlaup, that are generated by Iceland’s most active volcano, Grímsvötn” (From a Glacier’s Perspective).

Vatnajökull National Park
Vatnajökull National Park

As I mentioned in a previous post, a sandur is the outwash plain of a glacier; silt, sand and gravel are scooped up from the mountains by the glacier, carried by glacial rivers or glacial bursts down to the coast, where they’re dumped in huge desert-like plains of gray-black sands and rocks (Lonely Planet Iceland).  Skeiðarársandur is the prototype sandur for which all other sandurs are named.

Vatnajökull National Park with Skeiðarársandur in the background
Vatnajökull National Park with Skeiðarársandur in the background

As we climb, we see a river that flows into the sandur.

the river leading to Skeiðarársandur
the river leading to Skeiðarársandur
Vatnajökull National Park with Skeiðarársandur in the background
Vatnajökull National Park with Skeiðarársandur in the background

We continue our climb along a canyon until we get a glimpse of a minor waterfall, Hundafoss.

the gorge downstream from Hundafoss
the gorge downstream from Hundafoss
Hundafoss
Hundafoss
Hundafoss
Hundafoss

As we continue up, we can see the tips of other mountain peaks in the distance.

Climbing through Vatnajökull National Park to Svartifoss
Climbing through Vatnajökull National Park to Svartifoss

And of course, to the south, we can still see the immense sandur.

Climbing through Vatnajökull National Park to Svartifoss
Climbing through Vatnajökull National Park to Svartifoss
Climbing through Vatnajökull National Park to Svartifoss
Climbing through Vatnajökull National Park to Svartifoss
Svartifoss
the river leading to Skeiðarársandur

Finally, we reach a point where we get our first glimpse of Svartifoss, or Black Falls.

Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss

As we get close to the falls, we are bowled over by the geometric black basalt columns that flank the waterfall like ominous soldiers.  These columns are similar to those seen at the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland, Devil’s Tower in Wyoming, and the island of Staffa in Scotland (Wikipedia: Svartifoss).

Svartifoss
Svartifoss
me at Svartifoss
me at Svartifoss
walls at Svartifoss
walls at Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss
Svartifoss

After hanging out a bit at the waterfall, we cross a footbridge downstream from the waterfall, where we continue climbing to Sjónarsker.

Mike at Svartifoss
Mike at Svartifoss
Vatnajökull National Park with Skeiðarársandur in the background
Vatnajökull National Park with Skeiðarársandur in the background

It’s exhausting, all this uphill climbing, but we’re rewarded at the top by magnificent views of the surrounding mountains and Skeiðarársandur.  Many people continue longer hikes from here, but we’re not geared up to do such a thing.  Not to mention that it’s awfully windy and cold up here at these heights!

the view from Sjónarsker
the view from Sjónarsker
Sjónarsker
Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
view from Sjónarsker
me at Sjónarsker
me at Sjónarsker
Mike at Sjónarsker
Mike at Sjónarsker

We can even see another glacier tongue to our west.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
view from Sjónarsker to another glacier tongue

Of course, we have amazing views of Skeiðarársandur with the river snaking out to the North Atlantic Ocean.  It’s so immense that it boggles the mind.

view from Sjónarsker to Skeiðarársandur
view from Sjónarsker to Skeiðarársandur

From here, we get to walk downhill, thank goodness, to visit the traditional turf-roofed farmhouse, Sel.  By now, I’m pretty exhausted from all our walking today!

southeast iceland: hof to svínafellsjökull

Monday, August 22:  After leaving Fjallsárlón, we follow the Ring Road inland, keeping our eye out for a small town called Hof, where there is a storybook church.  We find the town nestled up against the slopes of a mountain

Hof
Hof
Hof
Hof
Hof
Hof

We easily find Hofskirkja, the wood-and-peat church built in 1884 by the carpenter Páll Pálsson, sitting in a thicket of birch and ash. It was the last turf church built in the old style on the foundations of a previous 14th-century building.

Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja

It is one of six churches still standing which are preserved as historical monuments.  The church is maintained by the National Museum but also serves as a parish church.

Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja
Hofskirkja

The little cemetery with its mounded graves and white crosses is charming, with bunches of purple flowers here and there.

cemetery at Hofskirkja
cemetery at Hofskirkja
cemetery at Hofskirkja
cemetery at Hofskirkja
cemetery at Hofskirkja
cemetery at Hofskirkja

After walking around this quiet place and using the very well-maintained WC, we’re on our way to the glacier Svínafellsjökull.  We drive down another 2.5km dirt road to a car park where there is a short but slightly treacherous hike to the glacier snout.

A memorial at the beginning of the hike tells of two German hikers, 25 and 29, who disappeared into the glacier in 2007.  The families of the two hikers erected the memorial.  Maybe one day,as the glacier retreats, someone will find the remains of these two unfortunate hikers.

Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull

According to Lonely Planet Iceland, scenes from 2014’s Interstellar were filmed here.  I saw that movie in China and guess I’ll have to see it again to see if I recognize this scene.  You can read about it here in Iceland Magazine: Reporter from CNN makes a tribute tour to Svínafellsjökull outlet glacier which was used as a set for Interstellar.

Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Mike at Svínafellsjökull
Mike at Svínafellsjökull
me with Mike at Svínafellsjökull
me with Mike at Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull
Svínafellsjökull

We leave here and head next to Vatnajökull National Park, but not before stopping to admire another outlet tongue of Svínafellsjökull.

Svínafellsjökull from a distance
Svínafellsjökull from a distance

More glacial views are to be had from the Ring Road.

view from the Ring Road
view from the Ring Road

On one side of us, looking inland, we see the offshoot glaciers of Vatnajökull; on the other side, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, is Skeiðarársandur, the largest sandur in the world.

 

southeast iceland: höfn to fjallsárlón

Monday, August 22:  We check out of Höfn Guesthouse early this morning, as they don’t serve breakfast.  We gobble down a banana and some yogurt and then we’re on our way to Vik, with numerous stops planned along the way.

Of course, we must make a few random roadside stops to take pictures of interesting scenes, like this pretty red-roofed farmhouse.

Farm along the Ring Road
Farm along the Ring Road
Ring Road landscape along southeast Iceland
Ring Road landscape along southeast Iceland

We make a quick stop at Brunnhólskirkja, a charming church that caught my eye yesterday as we zoomed along the Ring Road back to Höfn.

Brunnhólskirkja
Brunnhólskirkja
Brunnhólskirkja
Brunnhólskirkja
Brunnhólskirkja
Brunnhólskirkja

We find a memorial at the Hjallanes loop, a 7km hiking route which goes from a working farm in Skálafell towards Skálafellsjökull glacier and back to Skálafell.  Hjallanes is within the boundaries of Vatnajökull National Park, a remarkable area due to both glaciology and plants.  Although we’d love to do this hike, we have so many other things to squeeze in today that we bypass this one.

Memorial along the Ring Road
Memorial along the Ring Road

We stop to have a look at Skálafell, the working farm located between the town Höfn and the Glacier Lagoon where the Hjallanes loop begins.

Skálafell working farm and guesthouse
Skálafell working farm and guesthouse
Skálafell working farm and guesthouse
Skálafell working farm and guesthouse

As of 9:15 a.m. this morning, we have driven 2,025 km during our entire Iceland trip, and we still have some distance to go.

We make a brief stop at Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon, the same place we visited yesterday. We had to backtrack to Höfn Sunday, where we spent a second night, and so had to drive right past Jökulsárlón again.  It is a grayer day than yesterday, so we don’t take any more photos; we mainly stop to use the facilities and to grab a snack of mushroom soup, bread, and a chocolate-covered doughnut with sprinkles. 🙂

Not far past Jökulsárlón, we find a small sign off the Ring Road indicating Fjallsárlón.  This lesser-visited trail gives access to two glacial lagoons with a tiny river flowing between them.  Here icebergs calve from Fjallsjökull, part of the bigger glacier Vatnajökull.

Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón

It’s a dark and cloudy day and this lagoon is not heavily touristed, so the place feels a little desolate and eerie.

Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón

By the time we’ve walked around Fjallsárlón, we’ve walked 4,705 steps, and our day is just beginning!

Fjallsárlón
Fjallsárlón

We continue our drive towards Vik, with a few dramatic scenes along the way.

Ring Road views
Ring Road views
Ring Road views
Ring Road views

Before the road goes inland, we get our first view of the immense sandar, the flat and empty area sprawling along Iceland’s southeastern coast. This is the outwash plain of the glacier; silt, sand and gravel are scooped up from the mountains by the glacier, carried by glacial rivers or glacial bursts down to the coast, where they’re dumped in huge desert-like plains of gray-black sands and rocks (Lonely Planet Iceland).

Ring Road views
Ring Road views
Ring Road views
Ring Road views

We continue inland to the storybook church at Hof.

 

southeast iceland: last night in höfn

Sunday, August 21:  After leaving the Fláajökull glacier tongue, we continue to backtrack east along the Ring Road, where we run into a herd of Icelandic horses, and right across the street, some sheep.  Of course we have to stop for a visit.

Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn

I love how the horses’ long manes and bangs that cover their eyes.  They’re so adorable!

Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn
Icelandic horses near
Icelandic horses near Höfn

Just across the road, we find some sheep having a pow-wow.

Icelandic sheep
Icelandic sheep

Back in Höfn, we check into our new guesthouse Höfn Guesthouse.  It’s right above the town’s post office.  With 12 guest rooms, it has shared bathrooms and a little kitchenette with a microwave and electric kettle. No breakfast is served here. We settle in, have some hot tea and cheese and crackers.

Höfn Guesthouse
Höfn Guesthouse
Höfn Guesthouse
Höfn Guesthouse
Our room at Höfn Guesthouse
Our room at Höfn Guesthouse

After a bit of a rest, we head to Pakkhús, a restaurant overlooking the harbor in Höfn í Hornafjörður.  We have beers in the lower level while waiting for a table upstairs.  While sitting downstairs a little Dutch-looking girl with a bowl haircut seems to be fascinated with me.  She keeps walking over to our table and staring intently at me, as if I were some alien creature.

Pakkhús was originally built in 1932 as a warehouse, mainly from scrap wood of other houses.  The restaurant specializes in langoustine (Icelandic lobster); Höfn is often called the capital of langoustine in Iceland.  According to the menu, the langoustine here “comes fresh, straight from Sigurdur Olafsson SF44, the red ship often seen just outside our window and boats of Skinney Þinganes.”

I have Humar: oven grilled langoustine tails with spiced butter and garlic, served with mixed salad, bread and pink langoustine sauce.  It’s delicious!

Mike has Grænmeti: potatoes from local farm Seljavellir in a pie crust along with other vegetables, gratinated with icelandic feta cheese, served with mixed salad and yogurt sauce.

Mike at Pakkhús
Mike at Pakkhús

After dinner, we take a nice walk around the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður.  There’s a long trail through the marshes here.  Across the lagoon, we can see the glacier offshoots we visited today, one brilliantly lit by rays of sunlight.

The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
The glacier tongues around Hornafjörður
marshy path on the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður
marshy path on the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path

From the marsh trail, we can see the memorial to fishermen lost at sea; we visited this monument briefly last night.

memorial for fishermen lost at sea
memorial for fishermen lost at sea
Hornafjörður
Hornafjörður
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path
the marsh path

It’s cold and windy out on this promontory, and we’re feeling pretty bad now with our colds and coughs and tickling throats.  Though we’d like to stay out longer, we need our rest.

Tomorrow, we continue west to Vik.

Total steps today: 15,946 (6.76 miles).

southeast iceland: fláajökull glacier tongue hike

Sunday, August 21: Backtracking to the east, where we will stay another night in Höfn, we take a detour to a walking trail that goes to the Fláajökull glacier tongue, one of many glacier tongues flowing south from Vatnajökull glacier.

We have to take a gravel access road for 8km to a small car park.  It’s a long, bumpy and slow drive but manageable enough in our 2WD car.

A sign at the entrance warns of quicksand and dangerously cold water, sometimes covered with a thin layer of ice.  There is also a high risk of falling rocks and rock slides in steep hillsides next to retreating glaciers. The sign also warns that “fatal accidents have occurred due to collapsing blocks of ice, falls into crevasses and hypothermia.  Some have never returned from a glacier visit, their fate still unknown.”

The glacier tongue doesn’t look like it’s that far away, but, as we find every time we walk to a glacier, appearances are deceiving.

Fláajökull glacier tongue
Fláajökull glacier tongue

It is an awfully gray day, and quite dark and uninviting.

Fláajökull glacier tongue
Fláajökull glacier tongue
Mike at Fláajökull glacier tongue
Mike at Fláajökull glacier tongue

We cross a suspension bridge that leads to the trail.  It’s a wobbly bridge and we can’t help bouncing around on it like a couple of kids as we cross.

suspension bridge at Fláajökull glacier tongue
suspension bridge at Fláajökull glacier tongue
Mike on the suspension bridge
Mike on the suspension bridge
the wobbly suspension bridge at Fláajökull
the wobbly suspension bridge at Fláajökull

We cross paths with a man and woman walking across the rocky field in the picture below.  The woman tells us she thought it would be a shortcut, but because the ground is sandy and rocky, it was not a shortcut after all.  She advises us to stay on the trail.

Fláajökull glacier tongue
Fláajökull glacier tongue

It takes us a while to get to the lagoon at the edge of the glacier tongue.

Fláajökull glacier tongue and lagoon
Fláajökull glacier tongue and lagoon

Apparently, Fláajökull has retreated more than two kilometers (1 mile) over the last century.

Fláajökull glacier tongue
Fláajökull glacier tongue
Fláajökull
Fláajökull
Fláajökull
Fláajökull

There are a few spots of color, little tufts of wildflowers that manage to eke out a living in this rocky terrain.

wildflowers eking out a living on the rocks
wildflowers eking out a living on the rocks

The path winds along the edge of the lagoon over rocky terrain with often poor footing.  Sometimes it’s a little close to the edge and, as some of the ground on the edge of the lagoon looks muddy, I can’t help but wonder if it’s quicksand, especially after reading the warning sign.

the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull
the barren landscape around Fláajökull

The path, covered in loose rocks, rounds a precarious point on a narrow ledge.  I’m leery about proceeding around this point as I don’t want to fall into the icy water or sink into quicksand! Mike goes to the point while I linger behind, refusing to go any further.

Mike at Fláajökull
Mike at Fláajökull

From this point, Mike can see some hardy souls who have walked around the point up to the edge of the glacier, but I’m not willing to be one of those hardy souls.  The path is just too narrow and I’m too much of a klutz.

We slowly make our way back along the path, where I find more colorful wildflower tufts tucked in around the rocks, the only splashes of color in this barren place.

We continue picking our way among the rocks along the glacier tongue’s lagoon.  Several times we lose the path and come to a dead-end where it’s impossible to proceed.  We have to backtrack and gingerly find our way to the path again.  It’s not well-marked at all.

Fláajökull's lagoon
Fláajökull’s lagoon
Fláajökull's lagoon
Fláajökull’s lagoon
Fláajökull
Fláajökull

Finally, we make it back to the car park.  From there, we drive slowly back along the 8km gravel road, passing some sheep along the way.

Icelandic sheep
Icelandic sheep
the 8km gravel road back to the Ring Road
the 8km gravel road back to the Ring Road
Icelandic sheep at Fláajökull
Icelandic sheep at Fláajökull

We head back to Höfn, where we will check into our second hotel there, eat some dinner, and take a walk on a marshy path on the promontory Ósland, along Hornafjörður.

icebergs on the beach at jökulsárlón & a drive to another edge of breiðamerkurjökull

Sunday, August 21:  After our zodiac boat ride on Jökulsárlón, we walk down the banks of Iceland’s shortest river, the Jökulsá, which carries the icebergs out into the North Atlantic Ocean.  On the way, some of the icebergs come to rest on the black sand beach before melting or heading out to sea.  We take a brief walk among the icebergs that look like misshapen creatures taking naps on the sand.

Glaciers rest on the black sand beach at the river mouth of Jökulsárlón
Glaciers rest on the black sand beach at the river mouth of Jökulsárlón
the river mouth of Jökulsárlón
the river mouth of Jökulsárlón
Mike with the icebergs
Mike with the icebergs
icebergs at the river mouth of Jökulsárlón
icebergs at the river mouth of Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón
icebergs on the black sand beach at Jökulsárlón

After our walk along the beach, we head a little further west along the Ring Road to get close to the edges of Breiðamerkurjökull, the glacier offshoot we had seen in the distance from the ice lagoon. What an amazing glacier it is, with its fat fingers reaching from the craggy mountains onto the plain below.

Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull

After seeing the glacier, we turn around and head back to the ice lagoon, this time parking on the west side of the river Jökulsá, where we stand on the shore and watch the glaciers drift out to sea.  Some sea otters are playing among the floating glaciers, but sadly I can’t capture any of them with my camera.

icebergs float down the river Jökulsá to the North Atlantic Ocean
icebergs float down the river Jökulsá to the North Atlantic Ocean

We walk across the narrow walkway on the one-lane bridge, where we can stand over the river and watch the icebergs float by beneath us.

the river Jökulsá
the river Jökulsá
the river Jökulsá
the river Jökulsá
the river Jökulsá
the river Jökulsá

Finally, we walk back to the edge of Jökulsárlón one more time for a final view.

last views of Jökulsárlón
last views of Jökulsárlón

Since we’re staying back in the same town where we stayed last night, Höfn, this is the only time we have to backtrack on the Ring Road.  We hop back in the car and head east again, where we’re on the lookout for a sign posted by the Hólmur Guesthouse to an 8km-long gravel access road.  We plan to take that road to a suspension bridge and a walking trail to the Fláajökull Glacier.

 

southeast iceland: jökulsárlón glacier lagoon

Sunday, August 21:  There is no breakfast at the Guesthouse Hvammur, so we eat some Skyr, an Icelandic dairy product with the consistency of strained yogurt, but with a much milder flavor; we stored it overnight in the kitchenette refrigerator.  We also drink some of the coffee that the guesthouse does provide. I need all the coffee I can get as I’m pretty groggy this morning from the nighttime cold medicine and Tylenol I downed last night.  I’m miserable this morning with post nasal drip, a sore throat, a cough and tickle in my throat. Mike’s been sick several days already, and now I’m as sick as he is.

Still.  We can’t be stopped. We check out of the hotel by 8:15 and we’re on our way to Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon where we’ve reserved a zodiac tour of the lagoon with Ice Lagoon Adventure Boat Tours.  We arrive just before 9:30, so we have some time to walk along the rocky shore and take some photos.

Arrival at Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Arrival at Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon

From the bank, we see blue and white icebergs drifting through the glacier lagoon. The black stripes or blotches on the icebergs are ash layers from past volcanic eruptions.  Looking to the south, we can see the one-lane Ring Road bridge that crosses over the lagoon’s opening.

Ring Road bridge across the lagoon
Ring Road bridge across the lagoon

We check in inside the huge truck that serves as the operator’s office.  Here, we’re able to use a foot-pedal operated flush toilet and we don flotation suits and life jackets that inflate upon hitting the water.

Ice Lagoon Zodiac Boat Tour
Ice Lagoon Zodiac Boat Tour

We both look like creatures from outer space.

Mike all suited up
Mike all suited up
me ready for the boat ride
me ready for the boat ride

One of the guides insists that we stand up against the truck for a photo; only later do I realize that there’s an iceberg in the picture on the truck.  It definitely looks like one of those fake pictures!

posing in front of the truck
posing in front of the truck

Twenty of us pile into a bus and we’re driven east along the Ring Road and then on a bumpy dirt road to the edge of the lagoon.  There, we split into two groups, ten each, and pile into the zodiac boats.

Getting in the boat
Getting in the boat

Once in the boat, we take off at full speed across a 7km open expanse of water to the edge of Breiðamerkurjökull, an outlet glacier of the larger glacier of Vatnajökull in southeastern Iceland.  The icebergs in the lagoon calve from this outlet glacier.

Breiðamerkurjökull glacier
Breiðamerkurjökull glacier
Our captain
Our captain
Breiðamerkurjökull
Breiðamerkurjökull

After cruising back and forth in front of Breiðamerkurjökull, our captain tells us to hang on as we speed off toward the nearest iceberg.  He explains that some icebergs are blue because they don’t have much air in them; they were recently underwater or may have just turned over.  The white icebergs have been exposed to the air for a longer period of time.

blue glaciers at Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
blue glaciers at Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon

The icebergs calve from Breiðamerkurjökull, crashing into the water and drifting toward the North Atlantic Ocean.  We don’t get to see any calving or crashing action this morning, sadly.

Icebergs can spend up to five years floating in the 25-square-km-plus Jökulsárlón, which is 260m deep.  They often melt and re-freeze and sometimes topple over.  Our guide explains that one of the larger glaciers in the lagoon turned over at 6:00 last night, making a huge crashing sound.

Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón

I love this otherworldly lagoon, and find each iceberg has its own distinct character.  I can’t stop taking pictures.

Apparently, Jökulsárlón is only 80 years old.  The glacier Breiðamerkurjökull reached the Ring Road until the mid-1930s; it’s retreating now at a rate of 500m per year due to global warming.

Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón

We stop in front of a big iceberg, where our captain takes pictures of everyone on the boat.

Mike and me at Jökulsárlón
Mike and me at Jökulsárlón

Our boat ride is only an hour long, but we get to see so many variations of ice sculptures it’s like being in a museum.

After we exit the boat and ride the bus back to the truck/office, we shed our flotation suits and take a walk along the shore. From a hill on the path, we can see other offshoot glaciers from Vatnajökull in the distance.

Click on any of the pictures below for a full-sized slide show.

The views from the trail along the shore at Jökulsárlón are as amazing as the views on the boat ride.

Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
odd-shaped icebergs
odd-shaped icebergs
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón
Jökulsárlón

Finally, it’s time to head to our next destination.  As we walk down from the hill, we see the other big tour operator here, Glacier Lagoon Amphibian Boat Tour.  I’m glad we did the smaller zodiac boat tour.

The other tour company - Glacier Lagoon Amphibious Boat Tours
The other tour company – Glacier Lagoon Amphibious Boat Tours

We take a walk across the bridge to the mouth of the river Jökulsá, where we can see some icebergs floating out to sea and other icebergs resting on the black sand beach.

southeast iceland: vestrahorn & stokksnes to höfn

Saturday, August 20:  As we approach the end of the shallow bay, Lón,  we take a detour south of the Ring Road to Stokksnes NATO radar station, which is in the Horn area south of Vestrahorn. During the Second World War the Horn area was a base for the British army.  Today, the radar station is still here, although, as far as we can tell, it appears to be abandoned.

Now, we find the Viking Cafe and Stokksnes black sand beach, owned by a farmer who charges a small fee for admission to his property. The cafe also sells coffee, waffles and cake and has a small pay toilet.

Viking Cafe
Viking Cafe

On the property is a large Viking statue and a Viking village filmset built in 2009 by Icelandic film director Baltasar Kormákur Samper, who has been writing Vikings for over a decade.  It should someday be made into a film.

Viking statue
Viking statue

We can see the Viking village in the distance, but we don’t feel like walking all the way to it.  Cars are not allowed in this area.

Vestrahorn at Stokksnes
Vestrahorn at Stokksnes
a Viking filmset
a Viking film set

We walk out to the rocky coast with a view over the bay of Vestrahorn.

Stokksnes
Stokksnes
Stokksnes
Stokksnes

We’re looking for the black sand beach we’ve heard so much about.  We make our way to it, despite being buffeted about by a relentless wind.

view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes

I love the tufts of green grass growing on the black sand.  It makes for some atmospheric pictures, with Vestrahorn in the background.

view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
view of Vestrahorn from Stokksnes
Mike at Stokksnes
Mike at Stokksnes
Me at Stokksnes
Me at Stokksnes

It really is a shame it’s so windy and cold at this beautiful spot.  Sadly, with all the wind I’ve faced today, I’m feeling increasingly sick with a sore throat and a tickling cough.  Mike is feeling worse than he felt over the last couple of days.

Only about 7km more down the Ring Road, heading west now, we reach our destination for the day, the town of Höfn, known for fishing and fish processing.  It’s famous for its humar (langoustine, or “Icelandic lobster”), which I plan to sample tonight. 🙂

We drive to the end of town to the promontory Ósland where we have a view of Hornafjörður, a lagoon with a blend of fresh and glacial water.  From this viewpoint looking over the lagoon, we can see the four outlet glaciers of the biggest glacier in Europe, Vatnajökull.  From east to west, the four outlets are Hoffellsjökull, Fláajökull, Heinabergsjökull, and Skálafellsjökull. In the picture below, you can see three of these outlets.

Höfn
Höfn

Below is a closer up shot of one of these glacier outlets.

Höfn
Höfn
Höfn
Höfn

At the end of the promontory is a 1988 memorial for fishermen lost at sea, created in bronze and stone by sculptor Helgi Gislason.

statue at Höfn
statue at Höfn

We take a brief walk around the marina near our hotel, but it’s still awfully windy and we’re getting hungry.

marina at Höfn
marina at Höfn
old boat in Höfn
old boat in Höfn
marina at Höfn
marina at Höfn

We check in at Guesthouse Hvammur for one night.  We plan to stay another night in Höfn, but we originally only booked one night because we thought we’d stay further west along the Ring Road.  When we found there was nowhere else to stay until the town of Vik, we tried to go back online and book two nights at this guesthouse, but it was booked solid.  Thus tomorrow night, we’ll have to stay in another hotel in Höfn.

This is one of our least favorite hotels in Iceland.  It has a shared bathroom and no breakfast, although the room itself isn’t bad at all.

Guesthouse Hvammur
Guesthouse Hvammur

As we’re both hungry, we go to Kaffi Hornið, where we share a meal of house salad, sweet potato soup, and langoustine pasta with zucchini, leek, bell pepper, cream and penne, topped off with a beer for Mike and red wine for me.

Mike at Kaffi Hornið
Mike at Kaffi Hornið
me at Kaffi Hornið
me at Kaffi Hornið

I like the sign over the bathroom doors.

a great sign at Kaffi Hornið
a great sign at Kaffi Hornið

After dinner, we attempt to take a stroll around the promontory again, but it’s just way too cold, so we get cozy in our hotel room to prepare for our day exploring the southeast of Iceland.

Höfn
Höfn

Tomorrow, we plan on doing a Zodiac boat tour at Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon.  I sure hope it won’t be as cold and windy as it was today. 🙂

Total steps today: 8,328 steps, oor 3.53 miles.

southeast iceland: lón ~ driving from djúpivogur to eystrahorn

Saturday, August 20:  The drive from Djúpivogur to Höfn is about 105km, stretching around Iceland’s southeast corner.  There are no towns along this stretch, and thus no place for breaks.  We get one last glimpse of Bulandsdalur before we leave Djúpivogur, and, though we don’t know it at the time, we won’t see blue skies for the rest of the day.

last view of Bulandsdalur before leaving Djúpivogur
last view of Bulandsdalur before leaving Djúpivogur

Fog settles over the southeast Ring Road as it winds between sloping mountains and the North Atlantic Sea.  The sloping mountains look like giant piles of gravel that seem avalanche prone, made up as they are of gabbro (dark, often coarse-grained igneous – i.e. volcanic – rock rich in magnesium and iron) and granophyre, which has a fine texture and smaller grain size.

a stop near Eystrahorn
a stop on the Ring Road from Djúpivogur to Höfn

We pull off at the bottom of one of these strange mountains, and I feel unsettled, fearing that one loose rock could start a rush of all the rocks to the bottom, engulfing us and our economy-sized car.

Eystrahorn
a stop on the Ring Road from Djúpivogur to Höfn
Eystrahorn
a stop on the Ring Road from Djúpivogur to Höfn
Eystrahorn
a stop on the Ring Road from Djúpivogur to Höfn

The black sand beach is pretty, but it’s very cold and windy out here today, and foggy as well, so we don’t stop here for long.

Lón
a stop on the Ring Road from Djúpivogur to Höfn
our car and Mike near Eystrahorn
our car and Mike on a Ring Road stop
our car near Eystrahorn
our car on the southeast Ring Road
Lón
a stop on the Ring Road from Djúpivogur to Höfn

As we drive on, we come to a pull-off overlooking Lón (“lagoon”), a shallow bay whose 30km-wide estuary is framed by Eystrahorn and Vestrahorn, two granite spikes to the east and west.  A long sand and pebble beach stretches out between the two mountains and almost connects them except for some small estuaries.

Here, we can see the black sand and pebble beach reaching out into the lagoon.  A cold wind is howling across the lagoon here, and after taking our pictures, we huddle back into the warmth of the car.

Lón - glacial river valley
Lón – glacial river valley
rocky peak at Lón
rocky peak at Lón

We drive a bit further and see people walking out over the pebble beach. Of course I have to get out to see what there is to see.  Mike by now is so sick with his cough and sore throat, he opts to stay in the car with the heat on.  I’m also getting sick, and this little jaunt over the pebble beach, which isn’t easy to walk on, probably does me in for good.

the black sand and pebble beach at Lón
the black sand and pebble beach at Lón

From this pebble beach, I have a great view of Eystrahorn, a mountain with barren and gravelly steep cliffs, at the eastern end of Lónsfjördur.

Eystrahorn
Eystrahorn

You can glimpse our little red car in the parking lot; Mike is sitting inside, warming himself by the heater, while I’m being buffeted about by the gale-force winds.

Eystrahorn from the black pebble beach
Eystrahorn from the black pebble beach

Of course I have to take some pictures of the pebbles.  Between the wind and walking on these, I feel like I’m struggling through a sea of quicksand.

pebble beach at Lón
pebble beach at Lón

A little farm sits nestled in the folds of Eystrahorn across from the pebble beach. With all those slopes of gravel surrounding this farm, I don’t know how the people can live here without being in constant fear of a rock avalanche.

Eystrahorn from the black pebble beach
Eystrahorn from the black pebble beach

Even though my throat is hurting and I’m freezing through and through, I must take some pictures of the pretty wildflowers that are growing stoically from the amidst the pebbles.

wildflowers among the black pebbles at Lón
wildflowers among the black pebbles at Lón
wildflowers at Lón
wildflowers at Lón

Finally, I stumble across the quagmire of pebbles and make it back to the car, where I am grateful beyond belief that Mike has stayed in the car and kept the heater on.

farm in the shadow of Eystrahorn
farm in the shadow of Eystrahorn
farm nestled next to Eystrahorn
farm nestled next to Eystrahorn
Eystrahorn
Eystrahorn

We continue on around the lagoon.  Spotting a few dapples of light on mountains, I beg poor beleaguered Mike to pull over for a few more shots.

Mountain on the way to Vestrahorn
Mountain on the way to Vestrahorn
farmland along the southeast Ring Road
farmland along the southeast Ring Road
farm along the southeast Ring Road
farm along the southeast Ring Road

Finally we’re reaching the western end of Lón.

the western end of Lón
the western end of Lón

We’re not too far from Höfn now, but we have one stop to make before we get there: the Viking Cafe and Stokksnes. 🙂