andalucia: flamenco at the jardines de zoraya & a nighttime view of the alhambra from the albaycin

Thursday, July 11: After our Alhambra visit, we drive around the city and up to the top of the atmospheric Albaycin where we have dinner at Jardines de Zoraya, a restaurant that hosts an excellent flamenco performance with young local talented musicians and dancers.

Jardines de Zoraya
Jardines de Zoraya
Carole and Barry at Jardines de Zoraya
Carole and Barry at Jardines de Zoraya
me at Jardines de Zoraya
me at Jardines de Zoraya
me with Barry at Jardines de Zoraya
me with Barry at Jardines de Zoraya
delicious olives, wine, & cheese spread, for starters
delicious olives, wine, & cheese spread, for starters
Gazpacho
Gazpacho

Barry tells us that when watching flamenco, it’s all about the feet and the face.  The feet do most of the movement, and the face should express passion.   It is danced largely in a proud and upright way.  For women, the back is often held in a marked back bend. There is little movement of the hips, the body is tightly held and the arms are long, like a ballet dancer. Many of the dancers have trained in ballet as well as flamenco. I’m impressed by the girl’s footwork, but the male dancer has the passion down.  His facial expressions are very passionate, as if he’s pouring his heart and soul into that dance.  He’s also sweating profusely in his dynamic performance.

Flamenco dancers
Flamenco dancers
Flamenco! Ole!
Flamenco! Ole!
the flamenco guitarist
the flamenco guitarist

For me, dinner is cod loin served with seasonal vegetables.  It’s okay, but nothing special.  It looks really pretty on that blue plate though.

Cod loin served with seasonal vegetables
Cod loin served with seasonal vegetables

Carole has pork sirloin medallions with mozarabic sauce.  She seems quite pleased with her meal.

pork sirloin medallions with mozarabic sauce
pork sirloin medallions with mozarabic sauce

Barry has a roast lamb’s leg with boletus, whatever that is, and truffle cream with garnish.  He finds his meal just okay as well.

Roasted lamb's leg
Roasted lamb’s leg

For dessert, we’re served a sorbet of lemon and mango.  Yum.  I think this and the starters are my favorite parts of the meal.

sorbet of lemon and mango
sorbet of lemon and mango

After dinner, I do as Barry suggested and try to use my debit card to pay for my meal.  The guy runs it through his machine and he says, “Sorry.  This card doesn’t work.”  I say, stomach churning, “Do they say what the problem is?”  He says, “It’s too old; it’s expired.”  I look at the card.  Carole and Barry look at the card.  It definitely says it expires 06/13.  Oh my God!  I’ve grabbed the wrong BB&T card, the one that I found out expired while I was in Barcelona!!  For my post on that, see meeting antoni gaudí: casa batlló.  I would have cut it up immediately in Barcelona, but I didn’t have any scissors so I just put it back in my suitcase.  I must have grabbed it out of my suitcase this morning by mistake. (I had two BB&T cards with me, one for my personal account that EXPIRED on June 30, and one from the Joint Account that I have with Mike.  I knew the one from my account had expired; I thought the bank was rejecting the Joint Account card!)  All that worry for nothing.

Both Barrys and Carole get a good laugh out of this and they ask me if I will tell Mike what happened, after all my panicked texts to him this afternoon while he was in his doctor’s appointment.  I say I’m not going to tell him anytime soon, but I probably will tell him after I get home.  It will be the source of great amusement for him for some time, I’m sure; and I’ll become the butt of many jokes because of it.  Ouch.

After dinner, we take a five-minute walk to the viewing point at San Nichols where we see the beautiful Alhambra lit up at night set against the backdrop of the Sierra Nevada mountains.  It’s really is fantastic!

The Alhambra at night
The Alhambra at night
Alhambra at night
Alhambra at night
the Alhambra
the Alhambra
the Alhambra
the Alhambra
the Alhambra
the Alhambra

Today is the last big day of our tour, and we don’t get back to the villa until midnight.  I realize I’m going to miss Carole and Barry and Scottish Barry when we part ways tomorrow.  In the morning, we’re going to see some Dolmens near Antequera; after that, at around 1:00, I’ll be meeting Marianne & Michael from East of Málaga …. and more! for a two-night stay at their house. 🙂

andalucía: granada’s alhambra

Thursday, July 11: After lunch, around 3:00, we drive up to the Alhambra to spend a few hours wandering around the gardens and buildings before entering the amazing Nasrid Palaces on a timed entrance at 6:00.

The Alhambra and the Generalife were collectively designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984.

We start by walking through the Generalife upper and lower gardens to the Generalife Palace.  It was constructed as the leisure area of the Granada monarchs, where they escaped from their official routine.

Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
The view of the Alcazaba from the Generalife gardens
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
view of the Alcazaba from the Generalife gardens
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
Generalife
views of the Alcazaba from the Generalife
views of the Alcazaba from the Generalife
Generalife
Generalife

After we explore the Generalife, we head on the long walkway to the Alcazaba, one of the oldest parts of the Alhmabra, and its military area.

the pathway to the Alcazaba
the pathway to the Alcazaba

On the way to the Alcazaba, I stop in a bright little church along the way.

church along the pathway to the Alcazaba
church along the pathway to the Alcazaba
I take a break along the pathway
I take a break along the pathway

When we finally arrive at the Alcazaba, we visit the terrace of the Torre del Cubo (Round Tower), the northern wall walk, the Plaza de las Armas (including the military quarter), the terrace of the Puerta de las Armas (Gate of Arms), Torre de la Vela (Watchtower) and the Jardin de los Adarves (Wall Walk Garden).  As we walk around this part of the Alhambra in the hottest part of the day, we are wilting fast.  I don’t know how I will have energy for flamenco tonight.

the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
the Alcazaba at the Alhambra

According to the Alhambra De Granada’s website, the Alhambra was so-called because of its reddish walls (in Arabic, qa’lat al-Hamra means Red Castle). It sits on top of the hill al-Sabika, on the left bank of the river Darro, to the west of Granada and in front of the neighborhoods of the Albaycin and of the Alcazaba.

view from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra

The Alhambra sits on a strategic point, with a view over the whole city and the meadow (la Vega), and this fact leads to believe that other buildings were already on that site before the Muslims arrived. The complex is surrounded by ramparts and has an irregular shape. The Cuesta del Rey Chico is the border between the neighborhood of the Albaycin and the gardens of the Generalife, which sit atop the Hill of the Sun (Cerro del Sol).

view from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view of Granada from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view of Granada from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra

The first historical documents about the Alhambra date from the 9th century and they refer to Sawwar ben Hamdun who, in the year 889, had to seek refuge in the Alcazaba, a fortress, and had to repair it due to the civil fights that were destroying the Caliphate of Cordoba, to which Granada then belonged. This site subsequently started to be extended and populated, although not yet as much as it would be later on, because the Ziri kings established their residence on the hill of the Albaycin.

the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view of Granada from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view of Granada from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra

The castle of the Alhambra was added to the city’s area within the ramparts in the 9th century, which implied that the castle became a military fortress with a view over the whole city. In spite of this, it was not until the arrival of the first king of the Nasrid dynasty, Mohammed ben Al-Hamar (Mohammed I, 1238-1273), in the 13th century, that the royal residence was established in the Alhambra. This event marked the beginning of the Alhambra’s most glorious period.

the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
the Alcazaba at the Alhambra

First of all, the old part of the Alcazaba was reinforced and the Watch Tower (Torre de la Vela) and the Keep (Torre del Homenaje) were built. Water was brought by canal from the river Darro, warehouses and deposits were built and the palace and the ramparts were started. These two elements were carried on by Mohammed II (1273-1302) and Mohammed III (1302-1309), who apparently also built public baths and the Mosque (Mezquita), on the site of which the current Church of Saint Mary was later built.

flags atop the tower of the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
flags atop the Torre de la Vela of the Alcazaba at the Alhambra

We can see the snow-covered peaks of the Sierra Nevada from the tower of the Alcazaba.

view from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
view from the Alcazaba at the Alhambra
Jardin de los Adarves
Jardin de los Adarves
Jardin de los Adarves
Jardin de los Adarves

Even while enjoying the Generalife and the Alcazaba at the Alhambra, I’ve been worried about my debit card not working this morning.  Sometimes the regular hassles of life impinge on a holiday; unpleasant things sometimes have to be dealt with.   I still have a long time to travel, and I don’t know how I will have access to money if my bank has put a stop on my card.  Since it’s only a little after 5:00, and our tickets to the Nasrid Palaces aren’t until 6:00, I spend some time on a bench under the shade of a tree texting Mike: Mike! Emergency!  The bank put a stop on the debit card and the atm in granada actually ate the card!  The bank luckily gave it back but it can’t be used.  Can u please call the bank right away and find out what’s going on?  It worked perfectly well when I used it in Toledo!!! What the heck is wrong with that bank???

I don’t hear from him for a long time, so I’m not even sure he got my message.  I send another text: Can u plz let me know right away if u got my mssg???

Still no reply.  I then resort to texting Adam, who does reply right away.  When he does, I write him back: Hey!! Can u call dad and have him answer my texts to him asap?

Adam: Yes, 1 sec.

Me: Thanks sweetie! The bank has cancelled my debit card and I have no access to cash!

Adam, after a bit: He’s @ a doctors appt but if its really important u have to call him he says!

Me: I can’t call him! Did he get my texts??

Adam: Aggh i don’t know he seemed peeved and/or doing something important so I just told him that you needed him and he said for you to call him.

Me: Ok thanks!  I cant call bc my phone doesnt work here except for texts

Adam:  Oooo is there anything else i can do for you?

Me: No thanks sweetie!  Just make sure dad checks into this as soon as possible

Finally, I hear back from Mike: As soon as I get out of Dr. Appt I will check

Me: Ok i just need u to let me know that u get my texts!

Mike: Was in middle of annual physical and still finishing up.  Its hard to reply when talking to Dr or while he is examining me.

Me: Ok sorry!  I am so pissed at that stupid BB&T

Mike: Perhaps its the local bank software.  I’ll check.  Still waiting for EKG and tetanus shot.  Dr. Kessler was at Oman royal opera hall in late Jan or early Feb.  He is the NSO physician when they travel abroad.  Ltr.

About an hour later, Mike texts:  The bank did not see anything in their system about an attempted use or rejection.  Perhaps it was a glitch with that bank or ATM. They suggested trying a different bank ATM.

Me: OK, will try on monday when i can go inside the bank if it takes my card.  Thanks so much for checking.  I was really in a panic!! I hope it will work next time!

Mike: He saw no problems in their system which would show you trying to use it and a rejection.  You are still listed as traveling through the 25th.

I feel a little better after hearing this information, but I guess it remains to be seen whether the card will work next time I try it.

Finally, it’s 6:00 and Carole and Barry and I head into the Nasrid Palaces. There are three Nasrid Palaces:  The Mexuar Palace is from the reign of Ismail I and Muhammad V (1362-1391).  The second is Comares Palace, from Yusuf (1333-1354) and Muhammad V (1362-1391) and the Palace of the Lions, from Muhammad V (1362-1391).

first glimpse inside the Nasrid Palaces
first glimpse inside the Nasrid Palaces
Arabic calligraphy
Arabic calligraphy
interlacing patterns
interlacing patterns
Courtyard
Courtyard
intricate decoration on every surface
intricate decoration on every surface
Arabic script
Arabic script

Yusuf I (1333-1353) and Mohammed V (1353-1391) are responsible for most of the Alhambra’s construction that we still admire today, from the improvements of the Alcazaba and the palaces, to the Patio of the Lions (Patio de los Leones), the Justice Gate (Puerta de la Justicia), the extension and decoration of the towers, the building of the Baths (Baños), the Comares Room (Cuarto de Comares) and the Hall of the Boat (Sala de la Barca). Hardly anything remains from what the later Nasrid Kings did.

perimeter of the Patio of the Lions
perimeter of the Patio of the Lions
more intricate decoration
more intricate decoration
Patio of the Lions
Patio of the Lions
part of the Patio of the Lions
part of the Patio of the Lions
me in the Patio of the Lions
me in the Patio of the Lions
Patio of the Lions
Patio of the Lions
beautiful pavilion
beautiful pavilion

From the time of the Catholic Monarchs until today, Charles V ordered part of the complex to be demolished in order to build the palace which bears his name.  From the 18th century, the Alhambra was abandoned. During the French domination, part of the fortress was blown up and it was not until the 19th century that the process of repairing, restoring and preserving the complex started and is still maintained nowadays. (Alhambra de Granada: Historical Introduction)

tilework
tilework
columns and arches in the Patio of the Lions
columns and arches in the Patio of the Lions
more intricate arches in the Patio of the Lions
more intricate arches in the Patio of the Lions
arches and columns
arches and columns

According to the Alhambra website’s “Artistic Introduction,” the Nasrid architecture marked the end of the glorious period that started with the Umayyads in Cordoba in the 8th century. The architects of the Cordovan mosque, which was built a long time before the Alhambra, did not influence this architecture. It includes some of the typical elements of the Andalucían architecture, such as the horseshoe arch with sprandel (square wide frame which envelopes the arch) and the arch scallops (arch scallop of triangular shape), as well as its own special elements such as the capitals of the columns of the Alhambra.

the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra

The greatest concern of the architects of the Alhambra was to cover every single space with decoration, no matter the size. No decorative element was too much. Most of the interior arches are false arches, with no structure; they are there only to decorate. Walls are covered with beautiful and extremely rich ceramics and plasterwork. And the coverings have wooden frames that have been exquisitely carved.

the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra

The Alhambra was built with its own special type of column, which is not used in any other building. This column has a very fine cylindrical shaft, the base of which has a big concave molding and is decorated with rings on the top part. The capital is divided into two bodies and the first one, cylindrically shaped, has a very simple decoration and a prism with a rounded-angled base and stylised vegetal forms as decoration.(Alhambra de Granada: Artistic Introduction)

the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra

Even though Muslim art bans figural representation, the decorating themes in the Alhambra are quite varied. The classical calligraphic decoration is used, in particular cursive and kufic inscriptions, which reproduce the words of Zawi ben Ziri (founder of the Nasrid dynasty): “Only God is Victor,” and poems written by different poets of the court.

The decorative elements most often used by these architects were stylised vegetal forms, interlacing decoration and the nets of rhombuses.

the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra

I am amazed by the Alhambra’s decoration throughout the Nasrid Palaces.  Just like the Alhambra website says, every surface is covered with decoration, no matter how small or unimportant.  It is truly amazing.

However, for some reason I have an iconic picture in my mind of the Alhambra and I can’t seem to find it.  I imagine a picture of a beautiful cloister with a pool and garden in the middle.  Around every corner, I am poised to find this iconic image, but I never do.  Barry and Carole go ahead to meet Scottish Barry, but I keep poking into every nook and cranny looking for something that apparently doesn’t exist!

the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
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Leaving the Nasrid Palaces
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
Leaving the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
Leaving the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra
the Alhambra
the Alhambra

Finally, I realize that I’m a little lost and late to meet everyone at the car.  I walk as fast as I can to the entrance pavilion, where Scottish Barry is looking impatiently at his watch.  He tells us we must hurry to get to the flamenco show at 8:00. I tell Barry I was looking for an iconic shot that I remember seeing somewhere and I could never find it.  He tells me the iconic shot of the Alhambra is the Patio of the Lions.  Well, I spent quite a long time exploring that patio, and that wasn’t the shot I envisioned at all.  Besides, of all the pictures I took there, I don’t think I took that iconic shot! 😦

In the car, as Barry zooms to the Albaycin, Carole and I change out of our sweaty clothes and into skirts (“I feel like a girl now!” says Carole, with a sigh of relief).

On the way to Jardines de Zoraya, Barry has a great idea.  He tells me I should try to use my debit card to pay for the dinner and show tonight.  That way, I can find out if the card works and put my mind at ease.  Also, I’ll be dealing with a human being instead of an ATM, and if there’s a problem, they can tell me to my face what it is.  That sounds like a brilliant plan. 🙂

I have to say, overall, that I find the Alhambra to be lovely, but just a tad bit disappointing.  Maybe it’s my state of mind over the bank card debacle; maybe I have built up “the Alhambra” too much in my mind.  Maybe it’s because of the touristy nature of the place, unlike Cordoba’s Mezquita, which didn’t seem touristy at all.  Maybe it’s because of the heat, or the fact that I can’t find the classic view of the Alhambra that I’ve always held in my imagination.  It’s funny sometimes how so many factors can affect our experience of a place.  It is lovely, don’t get me wrong, it just doesn’t quite meet up to my expectations. 

Maybe it’s best to throw out all expectations of a place before going there, if it’s possible to do that. 🙂

andalucía: a churreria cafe, the alcaiceria & the granada cathedral

Thursday, July 11: This morning, we drive to Granada and stroll into the Bib Rambla, also called Plaza de las Flores (Square of Flowers), part of the old Silk Market and now the Flower Market of Granada.  In the center of the square is the Gigantones Fountain from the seventeenth century, which is held up by some very ugly characters. The Plaza Bib Rambla is named after Bab ar Ramia, meaning a ‘wall gate’. It was used in Moorish times for bull running.

some ugly characters hold up the Gigantones Fountain
some ugly characters hold up the Gigantones Fountain

We stop to sample some delicious Chocolate and Churros in Andalucía.  A churro, sometimes referred to as a Spanish doughnut, is a fried-dough pastry-based snack. It is normally eaten for breakfast dipped in hot chocolate or cafe con leche.  It’s delicious!

Churreria Cafe in Granada
Churreria Cafe in Granada
Churrerias!
Churros!
me eating churrerias
me eating churros!
making churrerias
making churros

Walking through the square we pass the Bishops Palace and walk into the Alcaiceria, the well-preserved old silk market.

a courtyard in the Alcaiceria
a courtyard in the Alcaiceria
spices for sale
colorful delicacies for sale
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
Alcaiceria
spices for sale near the cathedral
nuts for sale near the cathedral

Barry leaves us to explore the Granada Cathedral on our own. But before he does, he takes me to an ATM so I can get some cash for tonight’s flamenco show.  When I put the card into the machine, a traveler’s worst nightmare happens.  A message comes up that my card isn’t valid and the machine eats my debit card!

Luckily the bank is open and one of the bankers inside returns my card to me.  But he tells Barry the card has a stop on it and he shouldn’t be giving it back at all.  However, he can see the look of panic on my face and kindly returns it.

Despite having the card in my hand, it puts a damper on my day.  I know I don’t dare put it back into an ATM again.  I need to wait till it’s morning in the USA, so I can contact Mike and ask him to check with the bank about the card.  Luckily I know the PIN number for my Barclay Bank credit card and I’m able to get some cash out using that.  However, I don’t want to use a credit card for cash advances because of the exorbitant interest attached to cash advances on such cards.

I try to forget about this whole debacle because there is nothing I can do about it now.  I go into the Granada Cathedral and try to shake off my worries.  I love this cathedral because it’s light and bright inside, unlike many of the gloomy cathedrals I’ve seen throughout Spain.  I also love the circular capilla mayor with its star-painted dome.

Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral

Unlike most cathedrals in Spain, this cathedral’s construction had to wait until the Nasrid kingdom of Granada was acquired from its Muslim rulers in 1492; while its very early plans had Gothic designs, the church’s construction in the main occurred at a time when Spanish Renaissance designs were coming into play. Foundations for the church were laid by the architect Egas starting from 1518 to 1523 atop the site of the city’s main mosque; another architect took over in 1529, and it took four more decades to complete the design.

Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral

The most unusual feature of is a circular capilla mayor rather than a semicircular apse, perhaps inspired by Italian ideas for circular ‘perfect buildings.’ It took 181 years for the cathedral to be built.  Baroque elements were introduced into the facade during this long period, beginning in 1667.  Two large 81 meter towers foreseen in the plans were never built for various reasons, among them, financial (Wikipedia: Granada Cathedral).

Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral’s circular capilla mayor
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral’s round capilla mayor with its star-studded ceiling
Granada Cathedral
Granada Cathedral

We meet again and walk through the town and along a small river, where we get our first glimpse of the Alhambra on the spur above.

first views of the Alhambra
first views of the Alhambra

We also pass by some strange street art.

Street art in Granada
Street art in Granada
a little river below the Alhambra
a little river below the Alhambra
view of the Alhambra from our restaurant
view of the Alhambra from our restaurant

Before heading to the Alhambra, we stop for some tapas.  We won’t be having dinner tonight until after 8:00, when we go to see a flamenco show, so we need something light to hold us over.

cafe where we have lunch
cafe where we have lunch
Manchego Cheese
Manchego Cheese

We share a plate of Manchego cheese, a Spanish potato omelette, and artichoke hearts topped with anchovies.

omelette
Spanish potato omelette
artichokes with sardines
artichoke hearts topped with anchovies
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another tapas lunch

We also share some “little shrimps” crispy fritters with pearsil (parsley).

fritters
fritters

We can see the Alhambra beckoning us from above.  We’re due to begin our visit there at 3:00; we have timed tickets to enter the Nasrid Palaces at 6:00.

views of the Alhambra
views of the Alhambra
views of the Alhambra
views of the Alhambra

So, after our late lunch, we drive up to the entrance to the Alhambra, for the highlight of our visit to Andalucía.

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my itinerary for spain: here’s what i’ve got so far…

Tuesday, June 11:  I’ve planned my time in Spain, but, so far, I haven’t even begun to think of Portugal.  I know I better start thinking about it soon because I have to fly out of Lisbon on July 25.

Here’s my itinerary so far.

June 28-July 3: Barcelona, Spain, including Montserrat.  I’m staying at BCN Fashion House: (bcn fashion house)

I decided to skip Madrid altogether.

July 3-6:  Toledo, Spain.  I’ll be staying at La Posada de Manolo. Last summer when I was traveling in Greece, I met an inspiring South African lady, Marie-Claire.  She had come to Greece after traveling all over Europe, but especially in Spain and Portugal.  She highly recommended I stay more than one day in Toledo.  Since I have a small group tour lined up in Andalucia from July 6-12, I booked 3 days/4 nights in Toledo.

July 6-12:  I will head straight from Toledo to Malaga Airport, where I will meet Tour Andalucia: Tour Andalucia: Villa Tour

The small group tour includes the following:

  1. Meet at Malaga Airport and subject to arrival time, spend a few hours in Mijas, a lovely mountain village overlooking the Mediterranean, then travel and check in to the Villa.
  2. Breakfast and travel to Seville. Visit the Santa Maria Park to see the amazing Plaza Espana, the site of the American Exhibition of 1929. Walk from the park past some of Seville’s most historic buildings to the Barrio Santa Cruz. Wander through the narrow lanes of the Barrio and take a delicious tapas lunch ‘Seville style’ in one of the lovely small Plazas. In the afternoon visit the largest Cathedral in the world followed by the fabulous Alcazar, one of the oldest Royal Palaces in Europe. An elegant City, Seville was once one of the wealthiest in Europe.
  3. Breakfast and travel to Ronda. One the way, we stop at the historic site of Teba Castle, scene of a famous battle with the Moors. In Ronda we walk you into the town and leave you by the magnificent bridge over the gorge to explore and sightsee on your own. Maybe take a ride around the old town in horse-drawn carriages and wonder at the sheer magnificence of the town perched along the cliff top of the Tajo gorge. Wander through the elegant narrow streets of the old town and visit some of the magnificent houses and the museum of Ronda. Visit the famous Ronda bullring home of the Matador and the oldest in Spain, now a museum.
  4. Breakfast and travel to Malaga. On the way we visit the spectacular El Torcal National Park. Set high in the mountains there is a 45 minute walk through the amazing limestone formations. Arriving in Malaga at lunch hour we go to one of the great value seafood Chiringuitos by the sea. Sample fantastic sardines barbequed on an olive wood fire next to the Mediterranean. We take you into the centre of Malaga near the Cathedral and leave you to explore the town, maybe visiting the magnificent Cathedral, the large Moorish Alcazaba and Roman Theatre. And don’t forget the Picasso Museum since Picasso was born locally and his parents’ house is now the Picasso Foundation and open for visits.
  5. Breakfast and travel to Cordoba. We walk through the old City Walls and into the pretty Barrio San Basilio and see one of the typical patios that Cordoba is famous for. The Royal Stables shows us some of the famous Andalucian horses in a lovely set of buildings. Onto the Christian Alcazar, nowhere near as grand as Seville, but designed in the Mudajar style, a fusion of Moorish and Christian Gothic and the scene of famous historic events including the planning of the voyage of Columbus. The 1,000 year old Arab baths built for the Caliphs remind us of a society long gone and we wander through the Juderia visiting the old Jewish Market & the Synagogue. A great tapas lunch in the Bodega Mesquita followed by the highlight of the day, the spectacular Mesquita, the greatest Mosque in the Western World and the only one with a Cathedral right in the centre of it. The famous Puente Romano bridge awaits demonstrating why Cordoba was the capital of the Roman empire in the Iberian Peninsula.
  6. Breakfast and travel to Granada. Normally the highlight of our tour, we walk into the Bib Rambla, part of the old Silk Market and now the Flower Market of Granada. Here we suggest you sample some of the best Chocolate and Churros in Andalucia. Walking through the square we pass the Bishops Palace and walk into the Alcaiceria, the well-preserved old silk market. The Royal Chapel, commissioned as the burial site for the famous ‘Catholic Monarchs’ Ferdinand and Isabella, is now a museum and worth a visit. The beautiful Cathedral is one of the lightest inside that you will see. Have a light lunch and then we drive up to the Alhambra to spend a few hours wandering the gardens and buildings before entering the amazing Nasrid Palaces. After the visit we drive around the City and up to the top of the atmospheric Albaycin where we have dinner at Jardines de Zoraya who host an excellent Flamenco performance with local talented young musicians and dancers. A five-minute ‘after dinner’ walk takes us to the viewing point at San Nichols where we see the beauty of the Alhambra lit up at night set against the backdrop of the Sierra Nevada mountains.
  7. Breakfast and, subject to departure flight times, we visit the historic City of Antequera, home of the impressive 5,000 year old Dolmens and the first Alcazaba to fall in the reconquest of the kingdom of Granada. Return to Malaga Airport.

July 12-14: After my tour, I’ve been invited to spend two nights with Marianne, and her husband, of  East of Málaga …. and more!.  She lives in the countryside (el campo), in a beautiful area east of Málaga, known as La Axarquía.  I’m really excited to meet a fellow blogger who now makes her home in the south of Spain.

July 14-25:  Heading to Portugal.  I think I will try to rent a car in Malaga and just take off toward Portugal, ending up my last four nights around Lisbon.  While in Lisbon, I want to go to Obidos and Sintra, both highly recommended by my friend and fellow traveler, Marie-Claire.  I also want to explore the Alfama in Lisbon.  No specific plans for Portugal yet, but I’m sure I’ll come up with something before I leave Oman. 🙂