a morning with the windmills in consuegra

Saturday, July 6:  I take a taxi this morning to the Alcazar parking garage, where I collect my Peugeot and head out on the road by about 8:15.  I’m supposed to meet someone named Barry from Tour Andalucia at Malaga Airport by 2:00 today, and I’ve been told it takes less than 5 hours to drive to Malaga.   I figure I’ve built in an extra 45 minutes to make petrol stops and to see the windmills of Consuegra.

windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra

Consuegra is in the province of Toledo, Castilla-la-Mancha, about 60 km south of Toledo.  Right along the highway, I can see the town’s famous windmills perched on a hill next to a 12th century castle.  The castle and the windmills are Consuegra’s most important monuments.

the town of Consuegra from the hill
the town of Consuegra from the hill
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra

Most Spanish windmills, like those described in Cervante’s Don Quixote, can be found in the province of Castilla-La Mancha. The best examples of restored Spanish windmills are found in Consuegra. The castle was once a stronghold when Consuegra was the seat and priory of the Knights of San Juan.

windmills and the castle of Consuegra
windmills and the castle of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra

When I drive up the hill, I pass people who seem to be part of a running club, people walking their dogs, bicyclists and a tour group.  It’s a lovely morning with a cool breeze.  What an excellent place to get some exercise on a weekend morning!

windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra

Consuegra’s windmills became famous in the 16th century, when Don Quixote was first published. The windmills were introduced by “Caballeros Sanjuanistas” to help millers.  The machines used the wind to grind grain, most commonly wheat.  The windmills were transmitted from fathers to sons.  They stopped being used at the beginning of the 1980s (Wikipedia: Consuegra).

windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
windmills of Consuegra
the castle at Consuegra
the castle at Consuegra

After my brief stop, I continue on the highway toward Malaga.

24 thoughts on “a morning with the windmills in consuegra

    1. Yes, Marianne, they were really wonderful. It was a lovely morning too, with a nice breeze and clear blue skies. What a fun little detour!🙂 I’m off to Seville now; must shower, eat breakfast and dress in something cool and comfortable since it’s 40 degrees there today!

  1. Ahh …. but 40 degrees in Spain compared to 40 degrees in Oman….. NO COMPARISON! Glad, too you changed your mind and went to see the windmills! What a lovely detour! I think these are among my favourite photos as far as landscape goes! Cannot wait to see Malaga!

  2. Truly glorious photos Cathy! You really captured the beauty of the windmills of Consuegra. Another place I must visit – looks like you’re having a blast!🙂 ~Terri

    1. Thanks so much, mrs. carmichael. These comments must have been the ones in Spam, because I’m just now seeing them! It would have been wonderful to have a mojito with you in Barcelona.🙂 And as far as Seville, it was so hot there (43 degrees) it was difficult to enjoy; however the tapas and the Alcazar were great!

  3. Here’s a rather belittling account of the saffron association
    http://moochingaroundspain.com/2010/10/29/a-halfhearted-celebration-of-saffron-in-consuegra/
    and a better one http://travelingboy.com/archive-travel-frisbie-consuegra.html
    Saffron crocuses flower in the autumn and are very delicate, not at all showy but rather beautiful. You see them in other parts of Spain and Europe too, growing on grassy plains in arid areas. Lovely – I have taken many photos!

    1. Hi Caroline, Thanks so much for giving us these excellent links to teach us about saffron. I never knew saffron came from the stigmas of crocuses. I’m sorry I’m so late to respond to this, but for some reason it went into Spam! Maybe because of the two links. I’m glad I didn’t just do a mass trashing of my spam inbox! 🙂

  4. Consuegra is famed for its saffron. If you google you will come across several accounts of the Saffron fiesta (I tried to post a couple of links yesterday)

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